Cutlist для sketchup на русском


Cut List 4.1.1 Ruby Script

Normally one wouldn’t expect a minor revision to change functionality but merely fix bugs. However Steve’s changes in 4.1.1 make the interface between Cut List 4.1.1 and CutList Plus nearly seamless. Of my favorite SketchUp Ruby scripts this one ranks among the top. In fact, Cut List 4.1.1 is approaching the functionality I use in CutList Plus, and soon a new revision will probably convince me to drop CutList Plus from my design flow and only use SketchUp and Cut List. But not quite yet.

Background

My projects always start out the same – realizing my idea by sketching and designing in SketchUp, then producing shop drawings complete with a cut list. Having done that I am ready to go into the shop and prepare my stock. In addition to SketchUp I have always used CutList Plus for producing a cut list and parts list. SketchUp and CutList Plus do not naturally speak to one another; there is no export or import utility supported by either application that allows them to pass design information between them. However, SketchUp has a Ruby API and development console that allows third parties to produce scripts that can be used by SketchUp to extend its functionality. Most of these Ruby scripts are written by software developers, or wannabe software developers, and they are provided to you mostly for free. Steve’s Cut List 4.1.1 is just such a script.

If you use SketchUp and CutList Plus this article is for you. If you don’t use one or both applications you should look into them. CutList Plus must be purchased, but it is not expensive, and it is well worth the price. There are several editions (Silver, Gold & Platinum) that range from $89.00 to $499.00, and serve the casual user to the professional. The Silver version is limited to 50 different parts, but that is enough to handle most furniture pieces. My Six Pane Oak Hutch has 49 different components. If you need more parts you can break a design down into sub-assemblies. Go to http://cutlistplus.com/ to read about the differences between these editions.

Cut List 4.1.1 is free and can be downloaded by going to http://www.box.net/shared/ce18vpk36l. This is a zip file and must be extracted to the appropriate SketchUp Plugins folder. In the case of Windows 7 and SketchUp Pro 8 that folder is C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Google SketchUp Pro 8\Plugins. You may have an older version and it could be slightly different, so examine the Program Files (or Program Files (x86)) folder to determine the exact address. For MAC or other operating systems check the SketchUp website at http://sketchup.google.com/download/.

Once the zip file has been extracted to the Plugins folder you can open SketchUp and you will notice a new Menu item called Plugins. Under Plugins you will see a submenu called Cut List. This is what you would click to produce a cut list file.

As I mentioned earlier, my design flow starts with SketchUp, then Cut List 4.1.1 to produce a comma separated value (.csv) file, which contains the design data, and finally CutList Plus to import the .csv file and produce the parts list, cost estimate, cutting layout and other reports. You don’t need CutList Plus. You may be satisfied with the reports Cut List gives you, as you will see in a moment are quite extensive. Or you can import the .csv file into Microsoft Excel and manipulate it there.

Now Let’s Study an Example of how Cut List 4.1.1 Bridges SketchUp and CutList Plus

We will use a Wall Hanging Hand Tool Cabinet I design as an example. If you wish to follow along click on the link in the previous sentence to download the SketchUp model.

My SketchUp drawing, or model, is complete including all dimensions. It is not necessary to have all parts dimensioned, but it is necessary that all parts be fully defined components (groups work too, but if you use groups in place of components in your model consider your wrist slapped – shame on you). To create a cut list bring up a complete model without dimensions and select the entire model. Be careful not to select multiple instances of a model using “Select All” or you will get a cut list with inflated parts requirements. See the picture at left showing how I did this for my tool cabinet.

Select the Plugins/Cut List command. A menu selection page appears. With the CutList tab selected make the selections shown in the picture below. Any line you do not understand simply click the question mark icon to the right and a helpful text box will appear. Click the icon again and it disappears.

My tool cabinet is made of all rough cut hardwood so I normally would not have selected Layout Output options. However, I thought you might like to see an example layout, so I did in this case. If I use sheet material such as plywood I would always select a Layout Output option and get a visual cut list layout.

If you use the metric system you may want to choose Force Board Feet. It is not necessary if you use Imperial units.

Be careful naming components in your model. Notice in the picture above the keywords part, hardware, sheet, veneer, plywood, hardboard and mdf. These are keywords that indicate a component is either a sheet material or a part and not a component (you can use your own keywords). Do not use any of these keywords, or words containing them, when naming your components. If you do, those components will not be included in the Component cut list. I called one component a Drawer Partition and it was eliminated by Cut List 4.0.7 because “part” is contained in the word “partition”. I had to rename it divider. I haven’t checked to see if this is still the case in CutList 4.1.1, but best to avoid this situation.

Choose the Layout tab and you should see a selection page like the one below. If you texture your components, for example with a texture named Cherry, you may want to select Layout By Material to sort your layout by material type. Note that I have selected all nominal sizes so the script will choose the appropriate one from the list.

Since I have an 8” jointer, I am limited to rough cut boards about 7 ½” wide. I could choose 6” or 8” for the Nominal Board Width. I chose 6” in this case. I also chose a Board Length of 8’ in this example.

As I said earlier, I don’t find layouts to be useful for rough cut hardwood material. Boards come in random length and width. Only the thicknesses are useful. But for demonstration purposes I am generating a layout here.

You may wish to left click the Save Settings button to save these selections as I did. Now click Run. Two information boxes will appear to tell you where Cut List 4.1.1 stored the .csv files requested. Write the locations down so they can be accessed later. Click OK after each message and you will see the Layout Page view of a cut list shown on the next page.

Each board is nominally 6” wide (actually 5 ½”), 4/4 thick in this example and 8’ long. Above each board is the efficiency percentage (the board usage factor) which can be used in cost calculations.

Note that the boards are labeled with the SketchUp component name (Definition Name in the Entity Info box) and not the component’s instance or unique name (Name in the Entity Info box). You can print these layouts out with the Print Layout button.

At the top of the Layout Page are a few summary items of interest. See the picture below.

Notice the total efficiency is calculated to be 75.54% and the total Bd Ft is 128.0. These numbers are very accurate for sheet goods but not rough cut hardwood. For rough cut hard wood you are better off developing a historical empirical number based on how you do things in the shop and use it to adjust actual Bd Ft requirements into purchase requirements and then multiply by Bd Ft price to get cost.

One comment I would make about these layout diagrams verses CutList Plus layout diagrams. These are not terribly useful in the shop because they have no dimensions on them. CutList Plus produces a layout diagram with each part dimensioned so that you don’t have to cross reference the layout and cut list to figure out how to cut the parts. But I suspect in a soon coming release Steve Racz will include this capability.

Click the Close button on the Layout Page view and you will see the parts list shown below.

The entire list is not shown here because of its length. But let’s look at the headings. The first column is the Part #. This number is assigned by Cut List 4.1.1. Look at the Description column and you will see the Component names listed (Definition Name in the Entity Info box). In the second column, the Quantity column, is the number of instances of that component in the model. Remember that I told you not to use Select All in SketchUp to select your model, but rather to use the Select tool and select only the completed model. If you use Select All the Quantity column may be grossly inflated as will all subsequent calculations such as total Bd Ft.

The Length, Width and Thickness columns are self-explanatory. However, check to be sure that the dimensions in these columns run in the correct direction of the grain. Sometimes you design a part (component) whose length is shorter than its width and Cut List 4.1.1 may place the longer width dimension in the length column. This is generally not a problem, but check to be sure.

The Board Foot (per) and Board Foot (total) are the actual Bd Ft used by one component and then factored by the number of instances respectively. Efficiency (or board usage) factors are not a part of this calculation. The Total Length (Feet) column I have found no practical use for, but it appears to be the length per component times the number of instances.

Notice at the bottom of the Cutlist Page view is a summary: Total Component Board Foot 68.23. Compare this to the 128.0 Bd Ft total at 75.54% efficiency reported on the Layout Page view. Even taking efficiency into account you are left with 68.23 verses 96.69. I suggest you ignore the Layout Page view report altogether. The Cutlist Page view reports the actual total. Adjust this with your empirical number and go with that.

I use this Cutlist Page view primarily as a check to be sure all components were picked up correctly. Though I don’t examine it in detail I look for any glaring or outstanding problems. The detail checks I leave until I have a CutList Plus cut list.

Connecting SketchUp To CutList Plus Using Cut List 4.1.1’s Output File

The real magic of Cut List 4.1.1 lies in the .csv file stored in C:\Users\Joe Zeh\AppData\Local\Temp. The file is:

Wall Hanging Tool Cabinet_CutListPlusImport.csv

Importing to CutList Plus is done by either right clicking on the file name and choosing Open With/CutList Plus 2009, or opening CutList Plus and choosing File/Import and selecting the saved .csv file. A menu page will appear similar to that shown at right. Select Comma as the Delimiter and check “First row has headers”. Next, in the import column in each row I use the drop down box to match up the columns. Note for Banding, <Info> and Notes I choose <Skip this item>. I could do the same for Sub-Assembly, Material Type, Material Name and Can Rotate. But I left them in for discussion purposes. What I really want is the Part#, part Description, number of Copies, and the three dimensions. The rest of the information I can deal with more easily in CutList Plus. Since most of my cut lists will be similar I left click “Save Filter Changes” to save these selections. Then I click Finish.

An Import Results message pops up indicating that 21 components were imported. The 21 components agree with the number of components in my In Model components library of my SketchUp model. This is not the number of total parts, since a number of components are used numerous times. The total number of parts is the some of the numbers in the “Copies” column in the picture on the next page.

Importing Wall Hanging Tool Cabinet_CutListPlusImport.csv into CutList Plus produces the parts list shown below.

There are a few minor problems with this cut list. First, the Sub-Assembly column has the same entry for all lines and is simply the SketchUp file name. So that column is not terribly useful. However, there is a way to structure your model so that this column is very useful, but that is beyond this article; maybe a future post on my blog. It is especially useful if you are a kitchen cabinet maker.

The material type is labeled Dimensioned Lumber. That appears to be the default. Since I did not texture my components with a Material, the Material Name column has Non Assigned for each entry. Lastly, since I specified Layout Output option and nominal board thicknesses, the Thick(ness) column has 1” for all entries, meaning 4/4 boards.

Let’s rerun Cut List 4.1.1 with the following changes:

Choose the CutList tab and uncheck all “Layout Output” check boxes.Choose the Layout tab and uncheck all “Use nominal sizes” check boxes.

In CutList Plus re-import Wall Hanging Tool Cabinet_CutListPlusImport.csv and the cut list will look as follows:In CutList Plus re-import Wall Hanging Tool Cabinet_CutListPlusImport.csv and the cut list will look as follows:

Notice the change in the Thick(ness) column. Now we have our actual dimensions. Now I can clean up this cut list and save it in the same folder as my SketchUp model and with the same name. If you like letters for part numbers you can easily change that in CutList Plus too. The final cut list is shown on the next page.

One other point I should make. Cut List 4.1.1 and CutList Plus agree on total actual Bd Ft; 68.23 verses 68.21 respectively. But CutList Plus allows you to choose your efficiency – it calls it Waste – factor. I am not going to discuss how to use CutList Plus in this post. I will reserve that for the future since it deserves its own post. Suffice it to say that CutList Plus is rich and powerful. In addition to a cut list it can produce a Bill of Materials, Project Proposals, Cost Sheets including labor and other parts such as drawer pulls, sheet cutting Layouts, manage inventory and much, much more. You can download a 30 day trial version and give it a whirl. The learning curve is short, so have fun.

As I mentioned earlier, the file Wall Hanging Tool Cabinet_CutListPlusImport.csv can also be imported into Excel. But one note of caution is in order:

Open the Window/Model Info dialog box. Select Units in the left column and Decimal from the Format drop down box. If you use Fractional, Excel will not interpret them correctly; you may end up with dimensions that appear as calendar dates in Excel. You can switch back to Fractions after the Cut List 4.1.1 output file is generated.

Cut List 4.1.1 makes the bridging of SketchUp to CutList Plus or Excel seamless and easy; and who can argue with the price performance point. If you have never used it give it a try. I promise you will not be disappointed.

www.srww.com

CutList Bridge 4 | SketchUp Extension Warehouse

Overview

CutList Bridge is a SketchUp Ruby extension. It extends the attributes of components to include such things as the material type used in its milling, the species or material name, re-sized dimensions, shop method tags, the sub-assembly to which it belongs and much more. These attributes are attached to the component and stored in the model file. The user can export these attributes to either a .cwx or .csv file. CWX files can be opened in CutList Plus fx Gold or Platinum editions by simply clicking on the .cwx file(requires version 12.3 or higher). CSV files can be imported to CutList Plus fx (using a Parts import Wizard), Microsoft Excel, Open/Office Calc or any spread sheet application that supports CSV importing. All of these applications will produce a cut list but CutList Plus fx will also produce a materials list, optimized cutting diagrams, inventory control and project costing.

A very important feature of CutList Bridge is that it stores all components’ material and milling attributes in the SketchUp model file. The user need keep only one file of a design and doesn’t have to worry about synchronizing other files when design changes are made. The CWX, CSV, CutList Plus fx, Excel or OpenOffice Calc files can all be reproduced in about four mouse clicks.

CutList Bridge User's Guide

For more detailed information on CutList Bridge 4 see the User's Guide.

Bug Reporting

Please report all bugs or strange behavior to [email protected]

Major Features

Seamlessly bridges SketchUp and CutList Plus fx

CutList Plus fx is a highly functional cut list creator, costing tool, proposal generator and inventory manager for woodworking shops. SketchUp is a powerful 3D drawing tool ideally suited for furniture and architectural cabinet design and photorealistic rendering. These two tools do not naturally work together. CutList Bridge solves that problem by seamlessly bridging these two applications.

Export a cut list to Microsoft Excel or OpenOffice

Use the Export to Microsoft Excel or OpenOffice command to create a cut list in an Excel or OpenOffice spreadsheet.

Customize column output

Choose which columns you wish to include in a cut list export and specify the order they appear using the Columns tab.

Customize Cut List Thickness, Width and Length dimension columns

Cut List Thickness, width and length dimensions can be exported with dimension units or decimal inches with no units or both; making it unnecessary to convert Imperial or Metric unit dimensions to unit-less decimal inches in Excel or OpenOffice. This allows the user to easily calculate bd-ft, lin-ft or sheet quantity in the spread sheet.

Automatically sort Material Types in Excel or OpenOffice

If the Materials Type column is included in an export the Excel and OpenOffice spreadsheet is sorted in groups: Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber, Sheet Good, Other and Uncategorized.

All cut list attributes are entered in SketchUp and remain with the model file

CutList Plus fx requires the user to manually re-enter dimensions and other component attributes such as material type, material name, notes and banding. Attributes that can be generated automatically from the design’s 3D model ideally belong with the design file. CutList Bridge allows the user to enter and store all attributes with the model file and provides features for editing and exporting. Attributes which can be automatically generated from the 3D model, such as component dimensions and grain direction corrections are also handled in CutList Bridge and are automatically exported.

Components copied from another model can be pasted with their attributes When a user copies a component from another model, which has attributes already assigned, and pastes it into the current model, the component’s attributes will be pasted with the component. This is useful if the user has a standard set of components that are used across a number of models. For example, screws and biscuits. Unfortunately, this only works with the Edit/Copy and Edit/Paste tools. It does not work if you place an attributed component in a library folder and select it with the Components dialog box; nor does it work if you import a .skp file.

Sub-Assembly names can be assigned in SketchUp explicitly or automatically by Layer name

In CutList Plus fx a Sub-Assembly name is typically used to group a collection of components. For example: in a model of a chest-of-drawers you may want two Sub-Assembly names; one called Carcass for all the components that make up the basic support structure, and one called Drawers for all components that make up the drawers. A grandfather clock may have Sub-Assembly names of Hood, Waist and Base. A trundle bed might be divided into Headboard, Footboard, Sides and Trundle. A kitchen cabinet may have sub-assemblies of Cabinet, Face Frame, Drawers and Doors. CutList Bridge allows the user to assign Sub-Assembly names in SketchUp prior to exporting to CutList Plus fx.

Sub-Assembly names can also be assigned by layer using the layer’s name. For example, as stick frame house designed in SketchUp may be organized with layer names such as Footing, Foundation, 1st Floor Joists, 1st Floor Framing, 2nd Floor Framing etc. These layer names can automatically be used as the Sub-Assembly names in CutList Bridge fx.

Assign oversize/undersize dimensions in SketchUp via the Cabinet/ Resize Mode feature

<Info> is a CutList Plus fx field that is intended as a short note. However, it has two significant differences from the Notes field provided by CutList Plus fx. First, <Info> shows up in the CutList Plus fx spreadsheet whereas Notes only appear on the Parts printout. Second, if a CutList Plus fx spreadsheet is locked to prevent accidental change, <Info> can still be changed allowing for cutting status to be input. See the CutList Plus fx User’s Guide for more information.

CutList Bridge extends the use of <Info> when used in a special mode called Cabinet/Resize Mode. In Cabinet/Resize Mode parts can be oversized or undersized in length, width and thickness using the Resize feature and these cut list dimensions will appear in the CutList Plus fx cut list dimension fields. All three final dimensions will appear in the <Info> Field. The user has the choice of displaying the increment of over/under size or the over/under sized finished dimension for each of width, length thickness.

With CutList Bridge 3.x you can also output finished dimensions in their own field.

Assign Notes in SketchUp while designing the model

Notes can be assigned in SketchUp for each component. These will be exported to the Notes field in CutList Plus fx or in the Notes column in Excel and OpenOffice.

Both Milled Parts and Other Items are supported

CutList Plus fx supports two classes of components: Milled Parts, which are typically Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber or Sheet Goods that are milled into a component in the shop.

CutList Bridge also supports Other Items such as drawer pulls, consumables such as screws, biscuits, dominos or any other non-milled components which are typically purchased.

All Milled Part attributes can be assigned in SketchUp

Milled Parts, as mentioned, are components milled from Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber or Sheet Goods. Each Milled Part component can be assigned the following:

a. Material Type - Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber or Sheet Goods

b. Material Name – e.g. Tiger Maple

c. Banding – A code to indicate which sides are banded and which banding material to use.

d. Swap L/W – The user can specify in SketchUp any component whose length and width should be swapped. CutList Plus fx assumes the length field specifies the grain direction. However, there are times when the short dimension of a board should be the grain direction. Check Swap L/W to accomplish this.

e. Can Rotate? - Many material types have no grain. To assist CutList Plus fx in optimizing material use you can specify in SketchUp which Components can be rotated by CutList Plus fx.

Cabinet/Resize Mode provides Auto-Swap of L & W and Over/Under sizing of cut list parts

Cabinet/Resize Mode is a sub-mode of Milled Parts. It is selected in CutList Bridge by checking its checkbox. When selected <Info> is no longer available in the usual way. However, when selected another very useful and key option becomes available in addition to three more fields.

a. Enable Auto-Swap – This is a feature that automatically determines which components should have their lengths and widths swapped, independent of dimensions, based on a Component’s Type. In cabinet design there is a basic box with components that can be labeled Back, Bottom, Shelf, Side or Top. Based on these attributes L & W will be automatically swapped when needed such that grain runs up a side, across a top, down a side and across the bottom to the starting point. Back grain will always be in the vertical direction. Shelves will have a grain direction that is horizontal (side to side) while its cross grain direction is perpendicular to the Back’s plane.

b. Component Type - As mentioned is assigned with a drop down list and can be either Back, Bottom, Shelf, Side or Top.

c. Resize Thickness By – The user can specify a dimension to resize the thickness by (the increment, or decrement when preceded with a minus sign). The Thick column in CutList Plus will contain this resized dimension.

d. Resize Width By – The user can specify a dimension to resize the width by (the increment, or decrement when preceded with a minus sign). The Width column in CutList Plus will contain this resized dimension.

e. Resize Length By – The user can specify a dimension to resize the length by (the increment, or decrement when preceded with a minus sign). The Length column in CutList Plus will contain this resized dimension. The user is able to choose display options for the <Info> and Description fields that will modify what information appear in these fields in CutList Plus fx. More on this later.

Other Items can be specified while modeling in SketchUp

Components that are not milled in the shop but are purchased may be specified in the Item field. If the name specified in the Item field exists in the Raw Materials library of CutList Plus fx this component and its quantity will be appropriately categorized and added to the BOM in CutList Plus fx. If the name specified does not exist in CutList Plus fx it will still be imported but added to the [Not Categorized] Other Items category.

Component Numbers can be manually or automatically assigned

The user has three options for assigning component numbers. The user can manually enter component numbers by selecting each component in SketchUp (only one instance of each component needs be selected) and entering a component number in the Comp #: field of the Attributes tab. A second method is to let CutList Bridge automatically assign a part number using either numerically sequential integers or alphabetically sequential characters. Lastly, component numbers can be assigned by CabWriter, a new extension for drawing cabinets, which will soon be available.

extensions.sketchup.com

CutList Bridge 4 | SketchUp Extension Warehouse

Overview

CutList Bridge is a SketchUp Ruby extension. It extends the attributes of components to include such things as the material type used in its milling, the species or material name, re-sized dimensions, shop method tags, the sub-assembly to which it belongs and much more. These attributes are attached to the component and stored in the model file. The user can export these attributes to either a .cwx or .csv file. CWX files can be opened in CutList Plus fx Gold or Platinum editions by simply clicking on the .cwx file(requires version 12.3 or higher). CSV files can be imported to CutList Plus fx (using a Parts import Wizard), Microsoft Excel, Open/Office Calc or any spread sheet application that supports CSV importing. All of these applications will produce a cut list but CutList Plus fx will also produce a materials list, optimized cutting diagrams, inventory control and project costing.

A very important feature of CutList Bridge is that it stores all components’ material and milling attributes in the SketchUp model file. The user need keep only one file of a design and doesn’t have to worry about synchronizing other files when design changes are made. The CWX, CSV, CutList Plus fx, Excel or OpenOffice Calc files can all be reproduced in about four mouse clicks.

CutList Bridge User's Guide

For more detailed information on CutList Bridge 4 see the User's Guide.

Bug Reporting

Please report all bugs or strange behavior to [email protected]

Major Features

Seamlessly bridges SketchUp and CutList Plus fx

CutList Plus fx is a highly functional cut list creator, costing tool, proposal generator and inventory manager for woodworking shops. SketchUp is a powerful 3D drawing tool ideally suited for furniture and architectural cabinet design and photorealistic rendering. These two tools do not naturally work together. CutList Bridge solves that problem by seamlessly bridging these two applications.

Export a cut list to Microsoft Excel or OpenOffice

Use the Export to Microsoft Excel or OpenOffice command to create a cut list in an Excel or OpenOffice spreadsheet.

Customize column output

Choose which columns you wish to include in a cut list export and specify the order they appear using the Columns tab.

Customize Cut List Thickness, Width and Length dimension columns

Cut List Thickness, width and length dimensions can be exported with dimension units or decimal inches with no units or both; making it unnecessary to convert Imperial or Metric unit dimensions to unit-less decimal inches in Excel or OpenOffice. This allows the user to easily calculate bd-ft, lin-ft or sheet quantity in the spread sheet.

Automatically sort Material Types in Excel or OpenOffice

If the Materials Type column is included in an export the Excel and OpenOffice spreadsheet is sorted in groups: Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber, Sheet Good, Other and Uncategorized.

All cut list attributes are entered in SketchUp and remain with the model file

CutList Plus fx requires the user to manually re-enter dimensions and other component attributes such as material type, material name, notes and banding. Attributes that can be generated automatically from the design’s 3D model ideally belong with the design file. CutList Bridge allows the user to enter and store all attributes with the model file and provides features for editing and exporting. Attributes which can be automatically generated from the 3D model, such as component dimensions and grain direction corrections are also handled in CutList Bridge and are automatically exported.

Components copied from another model can be pasted with their attributes When a user copies a component from another model, which has attributes already assigned, and pastes it into the current model, the component’s attributes will be pasted with the component. This is useful if the user has a standard set of components that are used across a number of models. For example, screws and biscuits. Unfortunately, this only works with the Edit/Copy and Edit/Paste tools. It does not work if you place an attributed component in a library folder and select it with the Components dialog box; nor does it work if you import a .skp file.

Sub-Assembly names can be assigned in SketchUp explicitly or automatically by Layer name

In CutList Plus fx a Sub-Assembly name is typically used to group a collection of components. For example: in a model of a chest-of-drawers you may want two Sub-Assembly names; one called Carcass for all the components that make up the basic support structure, and one called Drawers for all components that make up the drawers. A grandfather clock may have Sub-Assembly names of Hood, Waist and Base. A trundle bed might be divided into Headboard, Footboard, Sides and Trundle. A kitchen cabinet may have sub-assemblies of Cabinet, Face Frame, Drawers and Doors. CutList Bridge allows the user to assign Sub-Assembly names in SketchUp prior to exporting to CutList Plus fx.

Sub-Assembly names can also be assigned by layer using the layer’s name. For example, as stick frame house designed in SketchUp may be organized with layer names such as Footing, Foundation, 1st Floor Joists, 1st Floor Framing, 2nd Floor Framing etc. These layer names can automatically be used as the Sub-Assembly names in CutList Bridge fx.

Assign oversize/undersize dimensions in SketchUp via the Cabinet/ Resize Mode feature

<Info> is a CutList Plus fx field that is intended as a short note. However, it has two significant differences from the Notes field provided by CutList Plus fx. First, <Info> shows up in the CutList Plus fx spreadsheet whereas Notes only appear on the Parts printout. Second, if a CutList Plus fx spreadsheet is locked to prevent accidental change, <Info> can still be changed allowing for cutting status to be input. See the CutList Plus fx User’s Guide for more information.

CutList Bridge extends the use of <Info> when used in a special mode called Cabinet/Resize Mode. In Cabinet/Resize Mode parts can be oversized or undersized in length, width and thickness using the Resize feature and these cut list dimensions will appear in the CutList Plus fx cut list dimension fields. All three final dimensions will appear in the <Info> Field. The user has the choice of displaying the increment of over/under size or the over/under sized finished dimension for each of width, length thickness.

With CutList Bridge 3.x you can also output finished dimensions in their own field.

Assign Notes in SketchUp while designing the model

Notes can be assigned in SketchUp for each component. These will be exported to the Notes field in CutList Plus fx or in the Notes column in Excel and OpenOffice.

Both Milled Parts and Other Items are supported

CutList Plus fx supports two classes of components: Milled Parts, which are typically Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber or Sheet Goods that are milled into a component in the shop.

CutList Bridge also supports Other Items such as drawer pulls, consumables such as screws, biscuits, dominos or any other non-milled components which are typically purchased.

All Milled Part attributes can be assigned in SketchUp

Milled Parts, as mentioned, are components milled from Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber or Sheet Goods. Each Milled Part component can be assigned the following:

a. Material Type - Rough Lumber, Dimensioned Lumber or Sheet Goods

b. Material Name – e.g. Tiger Maple

c. Banding – A code to indicate which sides are banded and which banding material to use.

d. Swap L/W – The user can specify in SketchUp any component whose length and width should be swapped. CutList Plus fx assumes the length field specifies the grain direction. However, there are times when the short dimension of a board should be the grain direction. Check Swap L/W to accomplish this.

e. Can Rotate? - Many material types have no grain. To assist CutList Plus fx in optimizing material use you can specify in SketchUp which Components can be rotated by CutList Plus fx.

Cabinet/Resize Mode provides Auto-Swap of L & W and Over/Under sizing of cut list parts

Cabinet/Resize Mode is a sub-mode of Milled Parts. It is selected in CutList Bridge by checking its checkbox. When selected <Info> is no longer available in the usual way. However, when selected another very useful and key option becomes available in addition to three more fields.

a. Enable Auto-Swap – This is a feature that automatically determines which components should have their lengths and widths swapped, independent of dimensions, based on a Component’s Type. In cabinet design there is a basic box with components that can be labeled Back, Bottom, Shelf, Side or Top. Based on these attributes L & W will be automatically swapped when needed such that grain runs up a side, across a top, down a side and across the bottom to the starting point. Back grain will always be in the vertical direction. Shelves will have a grain direction that is horizontal (side to side) while its cross grain direction is perpendicular to the Back’s plane.

b. Component Type - As mentioned is assigned with a drop down list and can be either Back, Bottom, Shelf, Side or Top.

c. Resize Thickness By – The user can specify a dimension to resize the thickness by (the increment, or decrement when preceded with a minus sign). The Thick column in CutList Plus will contain this resized dimension.

d. Resize Width By – The user can specify a dimension to resize the width by (the increment, or decrement when preceded with a minus sign). The Width column in CutList Plus will contain this resized dimension.

e. Resize Length By – The user can specify a dimension to resize the length by (the increment, or decrement when preceded with a minus sign). The Length column in CutList Plus will contain this resized dimension. The user is able to choose display options for the <Info> and Description fields that will modify what information appear in these fields in CutList Plus fx. More on this later.

Other Items can be specified while modeling in SketchUp

Components that are not milled in the shop but are purchased may be specified in the Item field. If the name specified in the Item field exists in the Raw Materials library of CutList Plus fx this component and its quantity will be appropriately categorized and added to the BOM in CutList Plus fx. If the name specified does not exist in CutList Plus fx it will still be imported but added to the [Not Categorized] Other Items category.

Component Numbers can be manually or automatically assigned

The user has three options for assigning component numbers. The user can manually enter component numbers by selecting each component in SketchUp (only one instance of each component needs be selected) and entering a component number in the Comp #: field of the Attributes tab. A second method is to let CutList Bridge automatically assign a part number using either numerically sequential integers or alphabetically sequential characters. Lastly, component numbers can be assigned by CabWriter, a new extension for drawing cabinets, which will soon be available.

extensions.sketchup.com

Cutlist and Layout from Sketchup

If you’re a fan of Sketchup for creating woodworking models, then the next obvious step is to use Sketchup to help you create cutlists and layouts. Sketchup plugin Cutlist 4.1 does just that. CutList 4.1 sketchup plugin helps you determine how much of each material you need to produce your design, taking into account nominal sized lumber with allowances for finishing to final size. Then it goes one further and lays out all of the pieces on boards or sheet good sizes of your choosing. Then you should be all set to head for the lumber yard to get all of the materials that you will need with no return trips.

CutList 4.1 was beta tested by our very own Lumberjocks and is now ready for download.

It’s being released exclusively to Lumberjocks first. You can download v4.1.10 here . This is a completely free plugin. This plugin has been around since about 2005 but continues to be maintained and enhanced. It’s got the look and feel of old Woodsmith magazine cutlists and layouts. A very early version v3.3 was reviewed in the Fine Woodworking blog 'Design.Click.Build.' by Dave Richards and a later follow up.

Note that there is now a forum on Lumberjocks for further discussion.

Cutlist 4.1 has been tested with both Skletchup 7, Sketchup 8, SU2013 and SU2014 on both Macs and on Windows PCs.

Installing. There are now 3 ways to install this.

Method 1 (easiest) Get and install it from Sketchup Extension Warehouse
  • Start up Sketchup
  • from Sketchup choose: Window->Extension Warehouse
  • Search for and select ‘CutList’
  • click on install ( big red bar on top right)
Method 2 (easy) Download and install it using the Sketchup extension installer A relative foolproof way to install is now available with the latest versions (from v4.1.6 and up).
  • Download it from link above
  • Start up Sketchup
  • from Sketchup choose: Window->Preferences
  • click on ‘Extensions’
  • click on ‘Install Extension’, hen navigate to and select the .rbz file you just downloaded
Method 3 (if all else fails) This is a two step process and more error prone
  • The file is a .rbz (a zipped ruby source) file. Extract the entire contents into your sketchup plugin directory not just the startup ruby script (srcutlist.rb). There is also a folder called srcutlistui which contains everything else it needs to work properly. The exact locations of the directories required for Sketchup plugins for Windows or Mac are found documented further down in the blog.

Running on a Mac. This is functional. Only the html output window for the layout does not work because of issues with the Safari browser, however, there is a workaround using the SVG export.

Someone in the forum asked a great question which I will repeat here:

Q. What is the point of the cutting diagram?

A. Why indeed would you want a cutting diagram? There are a few reasons:
  1. Regardless of whether or not you have a cutting diagram, eventually you are going to have to cut some wood to get a project built. How many boards do you need to buy? If you go by the board feet measured ( or calculated by something like the cutlist plugin) you’re going to find that it falls short. Why? because when you to to cut the pieces out of the board, you’ll find that you will inevitable have waste. By having the cutting diagram, you can see how much waste there is going to be and you know how much to get when you to the lumber yard.
  2. You’ve got a lot of parts to cut and you want your parts to be as accurate as possible before you even do anything else to the pieces. Ideally you want one setup for each size of part, so that you can cut each of the parts which are the same size at the same time. The cutting diagram lets you visualize how parts may be laid out to minimize on the cuts and the number of setups.
  3. Ok, you’ve decided to build your project out of sustainably harvested plantation teak. It’s selling for $50/square foot(!) for 3/4”. You might be interested in using those $200 boards as efficiently as possible. A cutting diagram may also be used to minimize waste. Even if you have waste if you could have a larger part left over which you could reuse for another project vs having a lot of offcuts, you’ve saved yourself some money and you are using the planet’s resources efficiently and responsibly.

So, to sum up, it gives you more accurate project requirements, it minimizes setup time and shop time spent cutting the boards while increasing accuracy and finally it helps to use the resources as efficiently as possible.

Finally here are some screen shots in case you still can’t quite figure out what it does or why you would want it or can’t imagine what it looks like.

Starting up cutlist. Highlight your project and select CutList from the plugin menu. Make sure all of the parts in your project are named and are either a component or a group. ( Nested components or groups are handled ok as well)

The screen that comes up allows you to select your cutlist options from the type of output you want, what you want to have included in your parts list, which parts are solid wood parts, which are sheet goods parts and which are hardware

and the next page allows you to select the layout options. There is a general options section, a tab for board options and a tab for sheet options.

Here is a sample of cutlist output. This is the cutting list in html format. This page can be printed.

If you scroll down, then there is a summary of the board feet and the materials and sheet parts and hardware are broken down to their own lists with their own summaries

If you selected the layout output, then another window will open and place all of the selected parts on boards of your choosing in a layout which minimizes waste.

Sheet parts layout is placed on the sheet sizes you specified.

There’s lots more. There is built in help on each option. Just click on the blue ? next to the option.

Feel free to pass along any comments, questions, enhancement requests or bug reports. I’m committed to maintaining the plugin and make it as useful as possible.

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

lumberjocks.com

Modeling Complex 3D Shapes with the Solid Tools

With SketchUp’s Solid tools, you can create new shapes by combining or cutting one shape with another, making it easy to model an outer shell or joinery.

SketchUp’s Solid tools work only on SketchUp solids. In SketchUp, a solid is any 3D model (component or group) that has a finite closed volume. A SketchUp solid cannot have any leaks (missing faces or faces that do not meet at an edge). The following image contains several solids.

Tip: To check whether your group or component is a solid entity, context-click it and choose Entity Info. In the Entity Info dialog box that appears, the upper-left corner indicates if the selection is a solid, as shown in the figure. If you’re having trouble identifying leaks that prevent your model from working as a solid entity, try searching the Extensions Warehouse for a third-party plugin designed to help with this problem.

Check out the following table for a quick introduction to the Solid tools, including what the tool does and whether it’s available in SketchUp Make or only SketchUp Pro.

To find the Solid Tools, look in the following parts of the SketchUp interface:

  • Solid Tools toolbar
  • Tools menu (Select Tools > Outer Shell or Select Tools > Solid Tools and select the other tools from a submenu)
  • Tool palette (Mac OS X)

In the following video, you see examples of the Solid tools in action. In the following sections of this article, you find steps and details about using each tool. (Note, however, that you can’t place SketchUp models in Google Earth anymore.)

Creating an outer shell

The Outer Shell tool () removes geometry inside overlapping groups or components, leaving only the outer faces.

Tip: Because an outer shell reduces a model’s geometry, creating an outer shell is helpful when you need to boost SketchUp’s performance.

For example, say you have two models: One is a detailed interior and exterior building model. The other model illustrates the building in a street view that shows surrounding buildings, streets, and landscaping. You can import the detailed building model into your street view. However, all that geometry might slow down your street view model and isn’t necessary. In your street view, creating an outer shell of the building eliminates the interior geometry you don’t need so that your street view model is lighter and renders faster as you work on it.

To create an outer shell from overlapping groups or components, follow these steps:

  1. With the Select tool (), select all the intersecting groups or components you want to include in your outer shell.
  2. Context-click your selection and choose Outer Shell from the menu that appears, as shown in the figure. The outer faces remain.

Or, you can create an outer shell as follows:

  1. Select the Outer Shell tool ().

    Tip: Until you hover over a solid group or component, you see an arrow cursor with a circle and a slash. When your cursor hovers over a solid group or component, the red circle and slash change to a black 1 inside a circle, and you see a Solid Group or Solid Component ScreenTip.

  2. Click to select the first group or component in your outer shell.
  3. Click the second group or component. SketchUp combines your selections into an outer shell so that only the outer faces remain.
  4. (Optional) Continue clicking additional groups or components to add them to your outer shell, as shown in the figure.

Note: The result of an outer shell is similar to the result of a union. However, the result of an outer shell contains only external faces, whereas a union can also contain internal geometry. The following figure shows two square tubes on the left, a union of the tubes in the center, and an outer shell of the tubes on the right.

Uniting solids into a single form

A union merges two or more solid entities into a single solid.

The result of a union is similar to the result of an outer shell. However, the result of a union can contain internal geometry whereas an outer shell contains only external faces. (See the preceding figure for an example.)

Here’s how to use the Union tool to combine solid entities:

  1. Select the Union tool ().

    Tip: Until you hover over a solid group or component, you see an arrow cursor with a circle and a slash. When your cursor hovers over a solid group or component, the red circle and slash change to a black 1 inside a circle, and you see a Solid Group or Solid Component ScreenTip.

  2. Click to select the first group or component for the union.
  3. Click the second group or component. The resulting union of the geometry remains.
  4. (Optional) Continue clicking additional groups or components to add them to the union, as shown in the figure, which uses X-Ray view so that you can see the geometry within each solid.

Tip: Instead of following the preceding steps, you can preselect the groups or components with the Select tool, context-click your selection, and choose Solid Tools > Union from the menu that appears.

Subtracting one solid from another (or use Intersect Faces with Model)

With the Subtract tool, you can use one solid entity to cut another solid entity. Your original solid entity is then subtracted from the model. For the subtraction to work, the two solids need to overlap.

Tip: When you use the Subtract tool, the order in which you select each solid entity matters. To remember which solid to select first, just think, “Use this to cut that.” In other words, the first solid you select is your cutting tool. The second solid you select is the thing that is cut.

To perform a subtraction, follow these steps:

  1. Select the Subtract tool ().

    Tip: Until you hover over a solid group or component, you see an arrow cursor with a circle and a slash. When your cursor hovers over a solid group or component, the red circle and slash change to a black 1 inside a circle, and you see a Solid Group or Solid Component ScreenTip.

  2. Click to select the cutting group or component. In the example shown here, select the peg first to make a hole in the board. After you make a selection, the 1 next to the cursor becomes a 2.
  3. Click the group or component that you want to cut. The cutting group disappears, but makes a hole in the second selection. In this example, you see a peg-sized hole in the board.

Tip: Instead of following the preceding steps, you can preselect your solid entities, context-click the selection, and choose Solid Tools > Subtract from the menu. SketchUp uses the order in which you select each solid entity to determine which is the cutting entity and which entity is cut.

If you’re using SketchUp Make, you can create the effect of a subtraction by using the Intersect with Model command. When you use Intersect with Model, the two shapes don’t need to be solid entities. (If fact, Intersect with Model applies a different effect if your shapes are solids, as explained a little later in this section.) However, when you create a subtraction with the Intersect with Model command, the process requires a few more steps than the process with SketchUp Pro’s Subtract tool.

Here’s how to create a subtraction with the Intersect with Model command:

  1. Create two distinct volumes, such as a box and a cylinder. (See Drawing Basic Shapes and Pushing and Pulling Shapes into 3D for help.)
  2. With the Select tool (), triple-click the first volume, which will be your cutting object. In this example, the cutting object is the cylinder, as shown in the figure.
  3. Move and rotate your cutting shape so that it intersects with the shape you’d like to cut. (See Moving Entities Around and Flipping and Rotating for help.) Leave your cutting shape selected, as shown in the figure.
  4. Context-click the cutting shape, and choose Intersect Faces > With Model from the menu that appears. The command tells SketchUp to create edges where the two shapes intersect.
  5. With the Eraser tool (), erase or move the geometry that you don’t want to keep. In the following figure, you see how the box shape is changed after the cylinder is erased. Tip: Remember you can hold down the scroll wheel on your mouse to temporarily switch to the Orbit tool, so you can orbit around and find all the geometry you want do delete. (See Erasing and Undoing for details about the Eraser tool.)

Intersect with Model creates edges in the current context. If your shapes are groups or components, you can create the intersecting lines either within the group or outside it. When you create the intersecting lines outside a group’s context, you can easily separate your original shapes from the edges that SketchUp creates, as shown in the following figure. See Organizing a Model for details about groups and Adding Premade Components and Dynamic Components for an introduction to groups and components, respectively.

Trimming one solid with another

With the Trim tool, you cut one solid entity with another, just like a subtraction. However, when you use the Trim tool, the cutting solid remains in the model. So, if you use a peg to trim a board, the peg remains after it cuts the board. Like all the Solid tools, the Trim tool works only if two solid entities overlap.

Tip: When you use the Trim tool, the order in which you select each solid entity matters. To remember which solid to select first, just think, “Use this to cut that.” In other words, the first solid you select is your cutting tool. The second solid you select is the thing that is cut.

To perform a trim, follow these steps:

  1. Select the Trim tool ().

    Tip: Until you hover over a solid group or component, you see an arrow cursor with a circle and a slash. When your cursor hovers over a solid group or component, the red circle and slash change to a black 1 inside a circle, and you see a Solid Group or Solid Component ScreenTip.

  2. Click to select the cutting group or component. In the example shown here, select the peg first to make a hole in the board. After you make a selection, the 1 next to the cursor becomes a 2.
  3. Click the group or component that you want to cut. The cutting group remains, but makes a hole in the second selection. The result is hard to see at first (refer to Callout 1). However, move the peg out of the hole, as shown in Callout 2, and you see the hole in the board.

Leaving only the intersecting geometry

With SketchUp Pro’s Intersect tool (), you select two or more overlapping solid entities, and only the intersecting geometry is left behind.

To perform an intersection, follow these steps:

  1. Select the Intersect tool ().

    Tip: Until you hover over a solid group or component, you see an arrow cursor with a circle and a slash (). When your cursor hovers over a solid group or component, the red circle and slash change to a black 1 inside a circle, and you see a Solid Group or Solid Component ScreenTip.

  2. Select a solid entity that you want to use in the intersection.
  3. Select one or more additional solids that overlap your initial selection. The resulting intersecting geometry remains. In this example, the intersection of the box and the sphere (Callout 1) creates a point with a rounded base (Callout 2).

Tip: Alternatively, you can preselect the solids you want to intersect. The context-click your selection and choose Solid Tools > Intersect from the menu that appears.

Splitting solids

With the Split tool (), you can divide overlapping solid entities along their intersecting edges. To perform a split, follow these steps:

  1. Select the Split tool ().

    Tip: Until you hover over a solid group or component, you see an arrow cursor with a circle and a slash. When your cursor hovers over a solid group or component, the red circle and slash change to a black 1 inside a circle, and you see a Solid Group or Solid Component ScreenTip.

  2. Click a solid entity.
  3. Click another solid entity that intersects your first selection. SketchUp splits all the geometry along the edges where the selected solids intersect. For example, in the figure, the two groups shown on the left split into 3 groups, as shown on the right.

help.sketchup.com


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